A Brief Introduction

Trial by Nature - Tips to Survival in the Courtroom


by Tricia Derr

David Attenborough’s voice is more distinguishable than his name or appearance. Writer and narrator of wildlife documentaries such as Blue Planet and Planet Earth, Attenborough is considered the “father of the modern nature documentary.”

Attenborough films display and explain the natural behavior patterns of the animal kingdom. Snow leopards, killer whales and exotic birds are captured in dramatic, high definition video. Breathtaking scenes are interposed with Attenborough’s buttery-sage British commentary on the uniquity of each species and its habitat. The prosaic message is larger than life. A careful listener unravels a complex and vibrant undertone teaming with universal application.

Existentially, you realize “survival of the fittest” does not only apply in the wild. After all, humans are animals too. The courtroom is simply another iteration of habitat. The laws of Mother Nature supersede the laws of man. Mother Nature doesn’t care if you are on the African plain or Courtroom #6150.

Smart trial lawyers are well-versed in the laws of man. Brilliancy in the courtroom demands appreciation of the laws of man and the rules of Mother Nature.

Over the years, I’ve collected a few examples of Mother Nature’s lessons worthy of courtroom consideration. I will release these examples in the form of tips over the next few months in a series entitled, “Trial by Nature: Tips to Survival in the Courtroom”.

 

Other Articles in the Series

Trial by Nature #3 – Stereotypes are Dangerous

Elephants can swim – even the really big ones. Weighing up to 24,000 pounds, these magnificent animals are impressive in the water. The trunk becomes a snorkel. Huge feet transform into diving fins. While they lumber awkwardly on land, they glide effortlessly in water. It is almost as though they were meant to be there in the first place.

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Trial by Nature #2 – Display Matters

The phrase “odd bird” doesn’t come close to describing this creature. Found in the rainforest of New Guinea, the superb bird-of-paradise looks like a little black bird most of the time. However, during mating season, the male bird goes all out to find a mate.

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